A beginner’s guide to the high-performance-java-persistence GitHub repository

Introduction

When I started writing High-Performance Java Persistence, I realized I needed a GitHub repository to host all the test cases I needed for the code snippets in my book, and that’s how the high-performance-java-persistence GitHub repository was born.

The high-performance-java-persistence GitHub repository is a collection of integration tests and utilities so that you can test JDBC, JPA, Hibernate and jOOQ features with the utmost ease.

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FlexyPool 2 has been released

Introduction

I’m happy to announce you that FlexyPool 2 has just been released!

FlexyPool 2 released

I started FlexyPool in 2014 because, at the time, I was working as a software architect on a large real-estate platform and we were about to launch the system into production. Because the system was split into multiple modules, we needed a way to figure out the right pool size for each module.

To make matters worse, the front-end nodes could be auto-scaled, so we needed monitoring and same fallback mechanisms in case our initial assumptions did not hold anymore.

And that’s how FlexyPool was born.

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JPA Criteria API Bulk Update and Delete

Introduction

JPA Criteria API bulk update delete is a great feature that allows you do build bulk update and delete queries using the JPA 2.1 Criteria API support via CriteriaUpdate and CriteriaDelete.

Because one of our community members asked me on the Hibernate forum about this topic, I decided it is a good opportunity to write about this lesser-known JPA Criteria API feature.

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Upgrading to WordPress.com Business Plan

Introduction

In this article, I’m going to explain why I took the decision of giving my blog and upgrade and why I chose the WordPress.com Business Plan.

When I started this blog, I chose WordPress.com because, compared to Blogger or other blogging services, it seemed a much more flexible alternative, especially in the long-run. Most web designers I knew were very familiar with WordPress, not to mention that it powers 25% of all Internet websites.

Four years, I’ve been using the Free Plan which, other than a Domain Name, it does not cost a dime. In the beginning, this was very convenient since I didn’t know what to expect from blogging. I was not sure if I was going to like it or stick to it.

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